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The Story Of The City Of New York Charles Burr Todd

The Story Of The City Of New York

Charles Burr Todd

Published January 1st 2012
ISBN : 9781458982223
Paperback
114 pages
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 About the Book 

Book may have numerous typos, missing text, images, or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1902. Excerpt: ... QUITE a number of distinguished gentlemen accompanied Sir EdmondMoreBook may have numerous typos, missing text, images, or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1902. Excerpt: ... QUITE a number of distinguished gentlemen accompanied Sir Edmond Andros to New York in 1678. Among them was the Rev. James Wooley, a recent graduate of Cambridge University, who came as chaplain to the kings forces in New York. On returning to England, Mr. Wooley published a little book called, A Two Years Journal in New York, which was eagerly read by the public of that day, curious to know something of the Dukes new possessions. We transcribe from this book some pleasant descriptions of the city and its domestic life in 1678-80, preserving the quaint English in which they were written. The country, he says, is of a sweet and wholesome breath, free from those annoyances which are commonly ascribed by naturalists for the insalubrity of any country, viz., south or southeast winds, stagnant waters, lowness of shoals, inconstancy of weather, and the excessive heat of the summer- it is gently refreshed, fanned, and allayed by constant breezes from the sea. It does not welcome guests and strangers with the seasoning distempers of fevers and fluxes, like Virginia, Maryland, and other plantations. Nature kindly drains and purgeth it by fontanels and issues of running waters in its irriguous valleys, and shelters it with the umbrellas of all sorts of trees from pernicious lakes, which trees and plants do undoubtedly, tho insensibly, suck in and digest into their own growth and composition those subterranean particles and exhalations which otherwise would be attracted by the heat of the sun, and so become matter for infections, clouds, and malign atmospheres. ... I myself, a person seemingly of a weakly stamen, and a valetudinary constitution, was not in the least indisposed in that climate during my residence there the space of three years. The people he found very hospitable, th...